Stem cell vesicles will help in the fight against aging

Scientists have discovered that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are capable of producing more vesicles than normal adult stem cells. This discovery will allow more efficient delivery of regenerating proteins, antibodies and other therapeutic agents to damaged or aging cells.

Read more

The properties of stem cells depend on the substrate on which they are grown.

Study by Canadian scientists has shown that various substrates for growing stem cells can change their molecular structure and behavior. The obtained data must be considered when conducting future research.

Read more

Stem cells from hair follicles will help in the treatment of diseases of the nervous system

The hair follicle stem cell population is able to repair the damaged myelin coating of neurons in mice. New data obtained by scientists from the US, open a promising direction for finding a cure for some neurodegenerative diseases.

Read more

Mesenchymal stem cells have demonstrated safety and enormous potential in the treatment of arthrosis

A study by Canadian scientists showed that the patient’s own mesenchymal stem cells from the patient’s own bone marrow holds great interest as a potential therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee joint (KOA) because of the unique ability to repair damaged cartilage.

Read more

A new approach in the treatment of diabetes with stem cells

American scientists were able to restore glucose metabolism in diabetic mice using encapsulated beta cells grown from human stem cells (hSCs). The addition of CXCL12, an immune-cell-repelling protein, to microcapsules protected transplants from immune attack, preventing the accumulation of fibrous tissue.

Read more

Stem cells are not equal

Researchers at the University of Toronto’s Institute for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) and the Donnelly Center have found a population of cells called “elite” that play a key role in transforming differentiated cells into stem cells. This discovery has important for regenerative medicine.

Read more

Stem cell therapy could replace kidney transplants

Scientists from the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) demonstrated the effectiveness of stem cells derived from the amniotic fluid in restoring organ function in a preclinical model of kidney disease.

Read more

Registered second case of cure for HIV with stem cells

The London citizen infected with HIV entered a long remission after a stem cell transplantation, which also helped him to beat the cancer. This is the second case in the world when a patient defeated HIV after a stem cell transplant.

Read more

Nicotine affects human embryos at the level of individual stem cells.

Scientists have found that nicotine at the cellular level induces a number of common pathologies in human embryonic development. Single-cell RNA sequencing of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) suggests that the three-week exposure to nicotine disrupts intercellular communications, reduces the survival of the cells and changes the expression of genes that regulate important functions, such as, for example, contraction of the cardiac muscle.

Read more

Pluripotent stem cells “invisible” for the immune system have been created

Scientists from the University of California San Francisco, UCSF, used the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing system to create the first pluripotent stem cells, functionally “invisible” to the immune system. This tremendous breakthrough in stem cell therapy can prevent graft rejection.

Read more